Monday, 08 August 2016 10:20

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  • Comment Link beverage Saturday, 11 August 2018 12:33 posted by beverage

    The Ducth have a long experience in flood control. Therefore with climate change beeing a reality, they do not have to play around with the problem just like some countries are seing it. To the dutch I believe it is not a joking matter. For them you either take action now or they are no more tommorrow! The threat of rising sea levels that is affecting California should not be a jimmick of who is who at the fore front of the debate but should be a carefully evaluated push that will save the delta like the dutch do during dialogue. Calmenness is needed and everyone should respect the views of others!

  • Comment Link german beer Saturday, 11 August 2018 12:22 posted by german beer

    In today’s Must See Monday, Eric Newton definitely captured my attention. Mr. Newton’s points and analysis of the past make perfect sense-because it is obvious when we look back. However, he brought up an excellent point about the future. If we only imagine what falls in line with the present then it is not innovation. In his analysis, Eric Newton presented a few timeless truths. The most inspiring and encouraging thing was hearing him say “ People in their 20s play a key role in developing new media… always have.” We do not have to wait to start thinking of new things, in fact, we should not wait at all. We have so many tools at our disposal. At the very least, we can start blogging and using social media. However, we also have the support of student organizations and programs. This is the time for change. Mr. Newton made another excellent point when he said, “ All the things you do now become exponentially more important as technology becomes exponentially larger.” It will become increasingly easier for people to abuse the news through technology which will create a larger demand for those who uphold journalistic values. It will also become more difficult to keep the audience interested, which will challenge journalists to be the very best and most creative. We’re the pioneers of the future.

  • Comment Link breweries Thursday, 09 August 2018 02:16 posted by breweries

    Eric Newton spoke of “The History of the Future of News,” and it was quite interesting. It definitely backs up the saying about history repeating itself. It does not necessarily have the exact same history, but without doubt, the concepts. Newton talked about human communication and its evolution. During the late 1950s and 1960s, the human race became obsessed with the Space Age. Everything was futuristic, from the furniture to the fascination with landing on the Moon. Television shows, for example: The Jetsons, Star Trek and Space Odyssey all show certain gadgets that are now in the 21st century, and some things that still have not been invented, at least in the public’s eye. In The Jetsons, the characters often communicated in way that we would call “skyping”, using Skype. In Star Trek, they used what looked a lot similar to a cell phone and in Space Odyssey, the iPad. Media will forever continue to grow, but with that, there will be more crises and wars.

  • Comment Link Custom Patches Friday, 03 August 2018 21:48 posted by Custom Patches

    This was a very exciting and promising Must See Monday, looking forward at what Journalism can and will soon be. Eric Newton gave a fascinating look at the potential of our industry. I’m a big tech fan, so the idea of having “NewsBots” delivering news and getting chips implanted is captivating. It’s a bit far-fetched, but, as Mr. Newton said, that’s what changes the world. “When thinking of the future, think crazy.” It’s thrilling to think that in the next couple years, my fellow freshmen and upperclassmen could be the minds behind unprecedented groundbreaking and innovative ideas that change the world. We’ve come such a long way in terms of progress, and most of the changes are recent. If you look back, the same medium of news delivery has been used over long periods of time, but now, it’s changing rapidly enough that new ideas are being created at unheard of rates. “Somewhere in the ocean of news is the truth, and I wish you all happy sailing.”

  • Comment Link Iron On Patches Friday, 03 August 2018 20:23 posted by Iron On Patches

    I thought it was interesting how this week’s Must See Monday was planned before the Tucson shooting occurred because the topic, “Communities in Crisis: Ethical Consideration for Journalists” is a fitting issue to discuss after such a tragedy. Nevertheless, the Must See Monday gave helpful insight on how to truthfully report and cover a crisis while remaining ethically sound that I think every journalist ought to know.Ina Jaffe from NPR West explained how she covered her first breaking news story, the Cleveland School shooting. One day, a man referred to as a loner showed up on the schoolyard and just started shooting around. Many children, mainly Southeast Asian refugees, were killed or wounded. Jaffe’s story was on how the school was patching up bullet holes, cleaning the schoolyard and planning to open the next day. Jaffe was horrified to have to stick a mic in the face of a child who just saw their classmates shot, but her editor said to not interview children. Instead, Jaffe reported on the scene and talked to people who were not children. Although children were the main ones who witnessed the event, interviewing them was crossing that ethical line that could have made the situation worse and more tragic. Children may have given insight into the horrific occurrence, but interviewing such young children would have brought more suffering.Based on his own experience covering tragedies and communities in crisis, Victor Merina from Reznet talked about the importance of observing your surroundings in addition to conducting interviews. When journalists are looking for that golden quote, they often fail at other things such as observing the location and people for the story. Observation can add much richness to stories and help the audience get a better picture of the scene. Merina also mentioned the importance of spending time with the people you interview to get a better understanding for the story. By taking that extra time to understand and make your sources feel comfortable, you build their trust and are more likely to gain helpful information for your article.I feel that this week’s Must See Monday gave valuable information and tips that many Cronkite students may need to use in their futures as journalists.

  • Comment Link Velcro Patches Friday, 03 August 2018 20:07 posted by Velcro Patches

    A History of The Future of News: What 1767 tells us about 2100 Eric NewtonTonight’s Must See Monday speaker was Eric Newton who took Cronkite students back through time into the different eras of media and the future of the media world. He explained how there have been four ages of media: visual, language, mass media, and digital and through these ages of media each generation comes of age with a different news medium. Newton showed a pattern of every eighty years how there is a Great Awakening in history. It was really positive to listen to Newton speak of Thomas Paine and his pamphlets and the muckrakers that we have been learning about in class. It validated a lot of the lectures we have had and encouraged me to continue to learn more about the history of journalism because it truly has built the foundation for what journalism is today.Then Newton moved on to discuss the future of journalism past 2011 and the potential media has even within the next forty years. Newton closed with the statement “ Today we are just scratching the surface of the digital age.” Which I found to be a powerful message and quite true, considering the Internet was developed only forty years ago and we’ve come, what seems like, so far since then. I believe the concepts we discussed tonight will stay in the back of my mind as I continue my career in journalism and might even become reality in all of our lifetime.

  • Comment Link Savannah Friday, 20 July 2018 20:57 posted by Savannah

    Hi there! This post could not be written much better!
    Going through this article reminds me of my previous roommate!

    He always kept preaching about this. I am going to send this article
    to him. Fairly certain he'll have a very good read.
    Thanks for sharing!

  • Comment Link wordpress custom Saturday, 14 July 2018 15:44 posted by wordpress custom

    I really enjoyed this post. You get at something very amusing and rather benign in English literary studies in the U.S., at least in comparison to what occurs with the study of literatures in Spanish in the U.S., especially in environments where there are many Latinos. The issue of native authority is racialized in Spanish, and students commonly expect their professors to be “natives” of Mexico or South America or Spain. It is natural, to a certain degree, that students should feel alienated or at least confused when confronted with an outsider who claims to speak to their identity and culture. One way of dealing, as a faculty member, is obsessing over one’s command of Spanish, since that linguistic ability becomes an index of one’s ability to gain acceptance.

  • Comment Link wordpress website Saturday, 14 July 2018 15:06 posted by wordpress website

    I thought Eric Newton made some interesting points at this Must See Monday. I found his point that science fiction has done a pretty good job of predicting future technology quite accurate and definitely true, with the Jetson’s version of Skype and the cell phones in an episode of Star Trek. Newton was right when he said that to predict what will happen, we have to think outside the box. The depiction of New York in 1999 that he showed us was an incorrect prediction because the technology was what was current when it was made. To even come close to possibly predicting what technological advancements will happen in the future of journalism, journalists need to think way outside the box. As Newton mentioned in his lecture, technology has changed dramatically within the past five years, and even the past year, as social networking sites like Twitter have gotten even more popular. He said that “each US generation comes of age as a different news medium is rising,” and this is definitely true, with just how much technology has changed in the last century. In conclusion, I enjoyed Newton’s lecture, but the extreme technological advancements he talked about honestly made me a little frightened for the future.

  • Comment Link Al-Zaytoonah University Wednesday, 11 July 2018 22:21 posted by Al-Zaytoonah University

    Before addressing the myth of the English professor, there are some real differences I experienced in grad school here and at the University of Leicester. While abroad: 1. Faculty went on strike one day in protest for higher wages, which closed down the entire university 2. Graduates prepare tea-time for the seminar break, rather than everyone rushing out (to smoke?). 3. One professor adds Saturday classes to be held in her office if not enough material is covered 4. The U of L has a Paternoster, an “elevator” in constant motion without doors in which people hop in and out. My favorite book on the myths of English professors is David Lodge’s Trading Places. For a scholar exchange program, Morris Zapp from Euphoric State University (US)and Philip Swallow from the University of Rummidge (UK) experience the 1960s on the other side of the Atlantic. (At one point, Swallow entertains at a faculty dinner: he has everyone play a game in which they state what they have not read. A Shakespeare scholar fesses up to not having read what turns out to be the faculty’s highest esteemed text for that field. He later does not get tenure because of this gap in his reading). I teach TP in Transatlantic Literature. The novels in this course express myths between the US and UK when characters encounter the other side of the pond.

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